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ECH - Brought Under My Authority: Dealing With The Abuse of Freedom

Updated: Jan 10



Empowerment Coaching Hub Founder©
Empowerment Coaching Hub Founder©

"Using my injuries to help others navigate theirs.

True empowerment comes from within."

"Feed your brain, like you feed your belly."

- Christina Blaskavitch

 

Empowerment Coaching Hub, 2023© All Rights Reserved®
Empowerment Coaching Hub, 2023© All Rights Reserved®



Brought Under My Authority:

Dealing With The Abuse of Freedom


- 1 Corinthians 6:12 -



In the vast expanse of human history, the concept of freedom has been a beacon of hope, a rallying cry, and a cornerstone of societies. Yet, like any powerful tool, it can be misused, leading to the abuse of freedom. This blog post will explore this topic, drawing wisdom from the ancient text of Sun Tzu's "The Art of War" and the biblical verse 1 Corinthians 6:12.


The Apostle Paul, in 1 Corinthians 6:12, states, "All things are lawful for me, but not all things are helpful. All things are lawful for me, but I will not be dominated by anything." This verse, often considered a proverb that governed the apostles' dealings with problems, provides a profound insight into the concept of freedom. It suggests that while we may have the liberty to do many things, not all actions are beneficial or constructive.


This verse hones in specifically in the areas of food and sex; bring these areas of focus under your authority. Food is for man to exist, while sex is for man to propagate. Man has the right to use them however should not abuse them, nor should he be under their power, controlled, and enslaved by them. Too much food damages the body and eating food sacrificed to idols stumbles the weak. The abuse of sex is fornication; not only is it condemned by God; it too destroys the body which is a vessel for the Lord.


Moreover, we should not let anything, even our freedoms, dominate us. You were bought at a price. Embrace that and glorify God in everything you do.


 

The Paradox of Freedom

Freedom is a double-edged sword, capable of both constructive and destructive outcomes. While it grants us the liberty to pursue our desires, not all actions permissible under freedom are beneficial or constructive. It is essential to discern the difference between exercising freedom responsibly and succumbing to its potential pitfalls.


The Art of Self-Mastery

In 1 Corinthians 6:12, the Apostle Paul reminds us that although all things may be lawful, not all are helpful or should dominate us. This wisdom emphasizes the importance of self-mastery and self-control. By understanding our own limitations and exercising discipline, we can prevent the abuse of freedom and ensure its constructive use.



The Strategic Restraint

Sun Tzu's teachings in "The Art of War" highlight the significance of strategic restraint. Knowing when to fight and when not to fight is crucial in achieving victory. Similarly, in the realm of freedom, exercising restraint becomes paramount. We must discern when to exercise our freedoms and when to restrain them, considering the impact on ourselves and others.



The Ripple Effect

The abuse of freedom often arises from a lack of awareness regarding the consequences of our actions. Failing to recognize the interconnectedness of our choices can lead to unintended harm. Both Sun Tzu and Paul emphasize the importance of understanding oneself and one's environment. By cultivating empathy and considering the broader implications of our actions, we can avoid the abuse of freedom.



The Path to Responsible Freedom

To navigate the delicate balance of freedom, we must reflect on our own understanding of freedom and its implications.This wisdom can be applied to our understanding of freedom. Knowing when to exercise our freedom and when to restrain it is a crucial aspect of maintaining balance and avoiding its abuse.


The abuse of freedom often stems from a lack of self-control and understanding. When we fail to recognize the impact of our actions on others and the world around us, we risk misusing our freedoms. This is where the teachings of Paul and Sun Tzu intersect. Both advocate for a deep understanding of oneself and one's environment, and the exercise of discipline and restraint.



Key Takeaways:

  • Freedom is a powerful tool that can be both constructive and destructive.

  • Not all actions that are lawful or permissible, are beneficial or constructive.

  • We should not let anything, including our freedoms, dominate us.

  • Understanding when to exercise our freedom and when to restrain it is crucial.

  • The abuse of freedom often stems from a lack of self-control and understanding.



By contemplating the following questions, we can develop a more nuanced approach to exercising our freedoms responsibly.

  • How do you define freedom, and what does it mean to you?

  • Can you recall a time when you or someone else misused freedom?

    • What were the consequences?

  • How can you apply the teachings of Paul and Sun Tzu in your daily life to avoid the abuse of freedom?

  • What strategies can you employ to ensure your actions, though lawful, are also beneficial and constructive?

  • How can you ensure that your freedoms do not dominate you?


The abuse of freedom is a complex issue that requires introspection, understanding, and discipline. By drawing wisdom from the teachings of Paul and Sun Tzu, we can navigate our freedoms responsibly, ensuring they serve us and our communities positively. Remember, "All things are lawful for me, but not all things are helpful. All things are lawful for me, but I will not be dominated by anything." Let this be the guiding principle as we exercise our freedoms.




 



 
Empowerment Coaching Hub, 2023© All Rights Reserved®
Empowerment Coaching Hub, 2023© All Rights Reserved®

My best advice, Never stop learning. Never give up on yourself.

Your best days are ahead of you, even if you don't see it quite yet.

We all need some help getting through the mud.


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